The Devil's Den

More Views

The Devil's Den

By: Keith Rocco

$0.00

Editions and Sizes

50 Signed & Numbered Canvases - 11 x 14" and 20 x 24"

* Required Fields

$0.00
Description

Details

Late in the afternoon of July 2, 1863, Confederate General John B. Hood's Division swept across the fields of Gettysburg, spearheading the attack on the exposed Union left flank. Hood directed his attack toward the rocky area known as the Devil's Den, a formation of huge, ancient boulders jutting out of the landscape in front of the hills known as Big and Little Round Top. General Hood was seriously wounded at the beginning of the attack and command control of the assault was lost. In the confusion soldiers of both sides fought savagely amongst the huge boulders, some falling between the rocks. The fighting was so severe that this part of the field has ever since been known as the Slaughter Pen. As was occurring elsewhere on the field, the overwhelming tide of Confederates had its inevitable effect. The combined pressure broke the Union left flank. The Southerners would hold the boulder strewn den for the remainder of the battle but their attempts to press on and capture the pivotal Little Round Top, seen in the distance in the painting, were thwarted by the timely arrival of fresh Federal forces.